Congratulations to Fallon Sherrock on her birthday

Fallon Sherrock, a darts player who has made history, has been appointed an MBE in the King’s Birthday Honours list. Sherrock, a Milton Keynes native, made history in 2019 by becoming the first female winner of a match at the PDC World Championship. She accomplished this by defeating Ted Evetts and Mensur Suljovic on route to the third round at Alexandra Palace, where she earned the moniker “Queen of the Palace.” Two years later, after defeating Suljovic once more on her way to the Grand Slam of Darts last eight, she made history as the first female darts player to make it to a major tournament quarterfinal.

“To have received this level of recognition for my contribution to the game I love is beyond my wildest dreams,” the 28-year-old stated on pdc.tv. I am so appreciative of this honor; I never imagined I would be bestowed with such a distinguished title. COMMERCIAL “I’ve had the good fortune to learn about the extensive influence my accomplishments have had on increasing the number of people who watch and play darts, especially encouraging ladies and young women to take up the sport and other sports. That fills me with immense pride and excitement.

“I am excited to visit Buckingham Palace to accept this honor, which I see as a testament to the game’s immense popularity and as a sign of hope and opportunity for aspiring athletes nationwide,” the woman said.

She continued her incredible feats in March, when she became the first female to throw a nine-dart finish at a PDC event, after winning the first Women’s World Matchplay in Blackpool last year. COMMERCIAL Her popularity at the oche has contributed to her rise to fame, as she has been a star guest on multiple TV shows. But after disclosing how difficult life had become for her on the women’s tour, her triumph in the men’s game has come at a price.

Her popularity at the oche has contributed to her rise to fame, as she has been a star guest on multiple TV shows. But after disclosing how difficult life had become for her on the women’s tour, her triumph in the men’s game has come at a price.

She talked about experiencing “hate” and being made to feel uncomfortable by her female opponents. She stated, “I could be the best person in the world and still get hate, or I could do everything wrong and still get it,” in an interview with the PA news agency. I’ve reached a point where I think, “If you’re going to hate me, then hate me.” “I won’t mince words; I actually don’t care anymore. I even understand it with players now. I don’t give a damn about what people think or say to me anymore.

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