What aspect of Barbra Streisand’s autobiography, “My Name Is Barbra,” surprised or horrified you the most?

The book “My Name is Barbra” by Barbra Streisand demonstrates how she reinvented the diva.

 

Streisand has frequently achieved success by defying advice from others, which is an interesting take on the negative diva cliché.

One of the biggest stars of the last 60 years is Barbra Streisand, whose autobiography, My Name is Barbra, was just released. In addition to 36 studio albums, 12 compilations, 11 live albums, and 15 soundtracks, she has released 117 singles. There are also a ton of awards. The Presidential Medal of Freedom, two Oscars, nine Golden Globes, five Emmys, eight Grammys, four Peabodys, and a Tony.

 

Being the first woman to win the Oscar as a composer, Streisand made history in 1977 when she won for best song (Evergreen, from her rendition of A Star is Born). She co-wrote the 1983 picture Yentl, for which she also received a Golden Globe for direction.

produced and starred in. Another woman did not receive the prize until 2021. She has released a number-one album in the US every decade since the 1960s, and she is currently the second-best-selling female album artist in the world, trailing only Taylor Swift this year in sales.

 

In other words, regardless of your opinion of her work, Streisand is unquestionably a trailblazer. Despite the fact that she has been called a “diva” on a frequent basis, she generally rejects the term. during a 2014 interview. Streisand addressed the subject head-on, seemingly dismissing the term for two reasons. Firstly, she is not an opera singer, and secondly, she finds its derogatory and gendered usage offensive. She questioned, “Why does no one call a man a diva?”

In other words, regardless of your opinion of her work, Streisand is unquestionably a trailblazer. Despite the fact that she has been called a “diva” on a frequent basis, she generally rejects the term. during a 2014 interview. Streisand addressed the subject head-on, seemingly dismissing the term for two reasons. Firstly, she is not an opera singer, and secondly, she finds its derogatory and gendered usage offensive. She questioned, “Why does no one call a man a diva?”

 

The word itself means “goddess,” however there are a lot of disempowering interpretations (difficult, self-important, demanding) for every empowering one (a celebrity, a queen, an idol).

 

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